High Intensity Interval Training

High Intensity Interval Training

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Are you ready to take your belly fat loss to the next level? Then high-intensity interval training or HIIT are what you’re looking for. They burn more calories, improve your cardiovascular fitness and melt away fat a lot faster than regular cardio can while spending less time working out.

HIIT training are proven to be more efficient for weight loss and although you will spend less time in the gym, they are by no means easy. This form of cardio training is very physically demanding and it isn’t for everyone.

If you cannot exercises at a very high intensity due to health or cardiovascular problems or are not a higher than average fitness level and are new to aerobic exercises then high-intensity interval training is not for you. At least not until you get into better shape. Try regular Interval training for at least 8 weeks before moving on to HIIT.

What Is High Intensity Interval Training

They are a modified version of interval training that involves a short burst of maximum intensity exercises followed by a slightly longer moderate intensity exercise. This offers a lot more benefits than regular and steady cardio that keeps your heart rate at the same level throughout the aerobics.

Pushing your body harder than you would with regular aerobics hold these advantages:

• HIIT burns more belly fat during your workout and because it is so taxing on your muscles it takes longer for your body to recover after a workout meaning your body continues to burn calories long after your training is over.

• They work on both your aerobic and anaerobic energy systems. When you train all out your body responds by improving its anaerobic system while at the same time building your aerobic fitness level.

• By working on the anaerobic it stops the muscle loss that occurs at weight loss, unlike cardio.

• Improves your metabolic rate enabling your body to burn fat as energy. Speeding up fat loss and improving your athletic endurance.

The main difference between HIIT and regular interval training is that at the high-intensity cycle you are putting out maximum effort not just increasing your heart rate. There are also different levels of intensity you can use at the low intensity or recovery cycle.

High-intensity interval training is often used to enhance performance in a particular sport. You can custom design them to meet the needs of your activity.

HIIT Training Tips

Before beginning a program you should be able to exercises for 20 to 30 minutes at 80% of your maximum heart rate without having any problems. Remember that they are very demanding which is why you should build up your sessions and not overdo it at the start.

It is important to warm up thoroughly for at least 5 minutes and to cool down for 5 minutes afterward.

HIIT are designed for people who want to boost their cardiovascular fitness level, their endurance and promote fat loss all without losing their muscle mass as they lose weight.

You must enter your anaerobic zone in the high-intensity cycle. You achieve this by working at maximum level and when you feel the burn in your muscles you are in the anaerobic state.

If you are performing shorter intervals, adjust the length of the recovery cycle if you feel you don’t fully exhaust your anaerobic energy.

Your heart rate should return to about 70% of your maximum but if it doesn’t by the end of your recovery cycle you need to shorten the high intensity and lengthen your recovery cycle.

High-intensity interval training is not for beginners or people with cardiovascular disorders. If you experience difficulty breathing or chest pains cool down immediately. Stopping suddenly can cause lightheadedness and faintness.

Do not perform any HIIT without the O.K. from your doctor. These interval training tips are good guidelines to follow.

Progressive HIIT Program

Incorporate the HIIT training tips above when performing this workout. To get the maximum belly fat loss you should be at a heart rate of at least 60% during the warm-up, cool down and recovery cycle.

Week

Warm
Up

High Intensity Cycle

Recovery
Cycle

Repeat Interval

Cool Down

Total Time

1

5 min.

1min.

4 min.

2 times

5 min.

20 min.

2

5 min.

1 min.

4 min.

3 times

5 min.

25 min.

3

5 min.

1 min.

4 min.

4 times

5 min.

30 min.

4

5 min.

1.5 min.

4 min.

2 times

5 min.

21 min.

5

5 min.

1.5 min.

4 min.

3 times

5 min.

26 min.

6

5 min.

1.5 min.

4 min.

4 times

5 min.

32 min.

7

5 min.

2 min.

5 min.

3 times

5 min.

31 min.

8

5 min.

2 min.

5 min.

4 times

5 min.

38 min.

This eight-week program is a good place to start as it will progressively get you at a higher fitness level. When you feel ready you can add more intervals and/or increase the length.

If you are training for a specific sport or activities, adjust the workout to meet your goals. For example, if you are training for sprinting, then you will need to perform short burst at maximum like 20 seconds of running and then 40 to 60 seconds of jogging. Repeat 15 to 20 times per workout.

Or if the workout is too difficult for your fitness level, diminish the length of the intensity or the number of cycles until you work up your fitness level.

Even when you’re training with high-intensity interval training it is a good idea to keep your regular cardio workout in the mix. Say you perform 2 HIIT sessions a week then you should keep doing at least 1 session of aerobics.

Remember consistency is the key but don’t overdo it. If you challenge yourself too hard you will burn out.

A good guide to High Intensity Interval Training is the Turbulence Training Program, it will take all the guess work out with its step by step instruction.

Using this guide will transform your body as well as your fitness level fast.

Updated: December 25, 2016 — 7:39 pm

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